Please scroll down for full course descriptions under the curriculum tables.

 

Limudei Kodesh Curriculum

9th Grade

10th Grade

11th Grade

12th Grade

Iyun I

Iyun II

Iyun III

Iyun IV

Halacha – Orach Chaim Chelek Aleph and Bais

Halacha – Orach Chaim Chelek Aleph and Bais

Hilchos Shabbos

Mishna Berurah

Chumash I

Chumash II

Chumash III

Chumash IV

Bekius I

Bekius II

Bekius III

Bekius Seder

Parsha

Parsha

Parsha

Parsha

Mussar – Meslas Yesharim

Mussar – Orchos Tzadikim

Mussar – Chovos Halevovos

Mussar Seder

 

General Studies Curriculum

9th Grade

10th Grade

11th Grade

12th Grade **

Secular                           Judaic

Concentration               Concentration

English I

English II

English III

English IV*

Mussar Seder
3:00 – 3:30pm

Algebra I

Geometry

Algebra II

Analysis/Trigonometry OR Pre-Calculus

Bekiyus Seder       3:30pm – 5:00pm

Biology

Chemistry

Physics

Nutrition

English IV*

World Geography

World History

U.S. History

Government*             (1/2 credit)

Government*              (1/2 credit)

P.E.                                 (1/2 credit)
(or one year of Basketball)

P.E.                                         (1/2 credit)
(or one year of Basketball)

Economics*               (1/2 credit)

Economics*              (1/2 credit)

Health  (1/2 credit)

Speech                      (1/2 credit)

Fine Arts OR Music                      (1 credit)

Computer Applications by exam

Computer            Applications by exam

*Dual college credit program for qualified students.
**Decision to follow Senior Judaic or Secular track must be made by the end of the Junior year.

Qualified Seniors may opt for additional classes and/or college credits

Curriculum Interpretations for Judaic and General Studies

Limudei Kodesh 9th -12th Grades

The core subjects of the Judaic curriculum remain the same through all four years of high school.  Each year advancing to a higher level and building on the past year.

Gemara

The cornerstone of our Judaic Studies curriculum is the Gemara Program. Our goal is not merely completion and memorization of the material. Rather, we strive to give our students the orientation, outlook, and methodologies necessary to teach them how to learn, so they will possess the vital tools needed for their success in understanding Gemara, Rashi, and Tosfos as well as all of the classic commentaries.

Tanach

The goal of the Tanach program is to develop the skills necessary to study and understand the classical Rishonim (Rashi, Ramban, S’forno, Ibn Ezra). Additionally, the students will be taught to glean insights both in Jewish ethics and Jewish philosophy.

Halacha

The Halacha class is designed so that a student becomes well versed in the Laws of Orach Chaim. Special focus is placed on practical Halacha for daily living.

Mussar and Ethics

Mussar is a vital tool for developing one’s strength of character. A Mussar class utilizing classical Mussar works will precede the Gemara class. Mussar shmuesen are delivered weekly.

Foreign Language

Students will gain proficiency in the speaking and writing of the modern Hebrew language.

General Studies 9th Grade

Algebra I

Beginning with a review of middle grades math, this course emphasizes various ways of graphing data, concepts of relations and functions, and the use of variables in expressions and equations. Emphasis is also placed on the development of graphing functions and solving equations and inequalities of the linear, quadratic, and absolute value types. Concepts of domain and range, rate of change, families of functions, simple matrix operations, probability, polynomials, and exponential functions are introduced to be expanded upon in later courses. Each student mush have a graphing calculator for use throughout the course. Demonstrations by the teacher will utilize the TI-84+ graphing calculator, the model recommended for use by the student.

Biology

Students conduct field and laboratory investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical-thinking and scientific problem-solving. Students study a variety of topics that include: structures and functions of cells and viruses; growth; and development of organisms; cells, tissues and organs; nucleic acids and genetics; biological evolution; taxonomy; metabolism and energy transfers in living organisms; living systems; homeostasis; ecosystems; and plants and the environment. No math requirement.

English I

Is a fusion of communication skills: writing, reading, creating, researching and orally presenting. The writing component includes sentence structure, paragraphing, composition, and research. Grammar, spelling, and vocabulary are major focuses throughout the course. Reading various literary forms are also pursued (e.g., poetry, essays, drama, short stories, non-fiction). A minimum of four novels are assigned. Projects based on the novels are presented to the class.

World Geography

Success in World Geography requires you to master social studies skills. Learn and practice skills covering geographic literacy, visual analysis, critical thinking and reading, and communications. You will also practice your skills by answering critical thinking questions on maps, pictures, charts, and graphs.

General Studies 10th Grade

Geometry

Students study Euclid’s postulates and theorems as the basis for an axiomatic system. Basic geometry shapes are studied. Direct and indirect proofs are emphasized. Coordinate graphing and basic constructions are studied.

Chemistry

Students conduct field and laboratory investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study a variety of topics that include: characteristics of matter; energy transformations during physical and chemical changes; atomic structure; periodic table of elements; behavior of gases; bonding; nuclear fusion and nuclear fission; oxidation-reduction reactions; chemical equations; solutes; properties of solutions; acids and bases; and chemical reactions. Students will investigate how chemistry is an integral part of our daily lives. Minimal math required.

English II

English II continues the foundation provided in English I. Basic writing skills, including advanced sentence structure and paragraphing. Grammar, usage, and style are emphasized. Vocabulary development is a major focus. Reading various forms which represent major writers throughout the world is presented.  Discussions of the criteria needed to judge the worth of a piece of literature are held. A minimum of four novels are assigned.

World History

This is a survey course in which the students will learn about the development of major cultures and civilizations from the early Egyptians up to the 20th century. Students will use maps of the civilizations to help with location, and primary sources to get a better understanding of events and cultures. In World History, students will be able to link similar events and look for patterns throughout the course of History.

Speech

Students will learn the skill of public speaking and speech writing. Students will see, read and hear examples of speeches and learn the components of a good speech, regardless of what kind of speech they are giving. Students will write and give speeches, review each other’s speeches and incorporate different speaking techniques and styles into their own speeches.

General Studies 11th Grade

Algebra II

Pre-requisites for this course are Algebra I and Geometry. Basic concepts emphasized are data analysis, modeling, and functions. Math concepts covered in Algebra I are expanded and new concepts introduced. Topics covered include linear relations and functions, linear systems, matrices, quadratic equations and functions, polynomials and polynomial functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, permutations, probability and statistics, sequences and series, and quadratic relations. The graphing calculator is used extensively and the TI-84+ model is recommended.

Physics

Students conduct field and laboratory investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study a variety of topics that include: laws of motion; changes within physical systems and conservations of energy and momentum; force; thermodynamics; characteristics and behavior of waves; and quantum physics. This course provides students with a conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical and scientific skills. Algebra and Geometry required.

English III

This course provides an expansion of skills presented in English I & English II. Formal writing of a five-paragraph essay is a main focus. Vocabulary development using SAT terms is emphasized. Reading various genre which represent major American writers is presented. A minimum of six novels are assigned. Students are encouraged to analyze and discuss universal themes and movements that run through major literary works. Students are practice skills tested for several standardized tests (e.g., TAKS, SAT). Writing a college entrance letter is also assigned.

American History

Students will learn about the people and events that shaped the United States of America. From the early explorers and colonization through the 20th century, students will be able to identify aspects of American culture that were shaped by American History. Students will be able to use graphs to illustrate various trends in population, economics and politics throughout the course of American History. The course will focus on common themes of the United States and the events that shaped American ideals and values.

Music

A study of the elements of music through learning to play the piano. Included will be rhythm reading, notes of the bass and treble clefs, major scales, minor scales, chords, and key signatures. Students will be able to play simple piano pieces as well as play melodies with one hand and chords with the other. The main idea is to learn by Doing. No previous musical experience is necessary. Individual electronic keyboards are used and are provided by the school.

General Studies 12th Grade

Pre-Calculus

Pre-requisites for this course are Algebra I, Geometry and Algebra II. This course is designed to help the student in his transition to the study of calculus. Included will be a review of algebra and geometry as well as a focus on exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions, vectors, complex numbers and conic sections. The study of trigonometry comprises almost half of the course.

Environmental Systems

Students will conduct field and laboratory investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study a variety of topics that include: biotic and abiotic factors in habitats; ecosystems and biomes; interrelationships among resources and an environmental system; sources and flow of energy through an environmental system; relationship between carrying capacity and changes in populations and ecosystems; and changes in environments. No math requirement.

English IV

This course is an advancement of concepts and skills provided in prior English classes and focuses on skills needed for college English and the business world. A primary focus is the research and preparation of a research paper. Reading various genre which represent major British writers is presented with a major focus on Shakespeare. The history of the English language is also provided. A minimum of eight novels are assigned. Students are practice skills tested for several standardized tests (e.g., TAKS, SAT). Writing a college entrance letter is also assigned.

Government

A single semester course, that will outline the branches and functions of the United States Government with a focus on the Constitution and citizen involvement. Students will understand the responsibilities of both the government and the citizens in all aspects of governmental affairs. Using primary sources such as the Constitution and Supreme Court rulings, students will analyze and discuss political movements and decisions throughout American History and gain a solid understanding of how the political process works.

Economics

The course of Economics is the study of how people try to satisfy seemingly unlimited and competing wants through the careful use of relatively scarce resources. This course also helps you to become more informed citizens and better decision makers and also to realize that good economic choices are the responsibility of all citizens in a free and democratic society.